Special Exhibit

The "Stranger's Disease":
Experiencing Yellow Fever in Galveston, 1837-1897

State Medical College, 1891, Courtesy Blocker History of Medicine Collections, UTMB
State Medical College, 1891, Courtesy Blocker History of Medicine Collections, UTMB
From Etienne Pariset and Andre Mazet, Observations sur la Fievre Jaune (1819), Courtesy The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
From Etienne Pariset and Andre Mazet, Observations sur la Fievre Jaune (1819), Courtesy The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

In the 19th century, Galveston suffered epidemics of yellow fever at least eight times. Thousands died, commerce stagnated, and the best medical minds were confounded.

Stranger's Disease offers an examination of the impact of yellow fever epidemics on the development of Galveston. The disease is spread by mosquitos, like current global health threats Zika and West Nile virus. For years, however, no one in the medical community understood how or why yellow fever attacked populations. Experience the stories of uncertainty and perseverance that led to the discovery of the cause of the disease and an effective treatment.

Stranger's Disease is co-curated by students from the Institute for the Medical Humanities, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

On display: February 2 – May 8, 2017

UTMB Institute for the Medical Humanities